Email Us

Eastern Woodland Hunters
Environment / Housing Food / Hunting / Tools Transportation / Migration Religion / Ceremonies / Art / Clothing Family / Social Structure / Leadership Tribal Relations / War
The people of the Eastern Woodlands are classified into two main groups, the Iroquois (Eastern Woodlands farmers) and the Algonquians (Eastern Woodlands hunters). This division is based on the roots of their languages and their main source of food.
Arrival Ancestors of the Eastern Woodlands people of Canada first arrived in the region 10,000 years ago, at the end of the last Ice Age.
Map Source - The Canadian Encyclopedia
Location
Southwest Ontario, Southern Ontario (excluding the very south that was occupied by the Eastern Woodland Farmers), Southern Quebec and the Maritime Provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island).
Languages
Central Algonquian and Eastern Algonquian
Nations
Ojibwa, Ottawa, Nipissing, Algonquin (not to be mistaken from Algonquian), Maliseet, Mi'kmaq and Abenaki
Note: the Abenaki are located in the USA, so they are not included in the information.
Ojibwa
Name "Ojibwa" is derived from the word "Ozhibii'oweg" meaning "Those who keep Records of a Vision" referring to their form of pictorial writing.
Ojibwa girls
Location Area around Lake Superior to northeast Georgian Bay.
Language Central Algonquian
Ottawa
Name "Ottawa" is spelled "Odawa" in their native language, and means "traders".
Ottawa noble
Location Manitoulin Island and the Bruce Peninsula
Language Central Algonquian
Nipissing
Name Their name means "at the little water or lake" referring to Lake Nipissing.
Lake Nipissing
Location Lake Nipissing area
Language Central Algonquian
Algonquin
Location Ottawa River and area
Algonquin mother and son
Language Central Algonquian
Maliseet
Name The Maliseet call themselves "Wolastoqiyik". "Maliseet" is a Micmac word for someone who can't talk very well.
Maliseet woman
Location St. Lawrence Valley to the Bay of Fundy, eastern Maine, and western New Brunswick
Language Eastern Algonquian
Micmac or Mi'kmaq
Name Their name comes from a word in their own language meaning "allies."
Mi'kmaq woman
Location Southeast part of the Gaspe Peninsula, eastern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia
Language Eastern Algonquian
Environment / Housing Food / Hunting / Tools Transportation / Migration Religion / Ceremonies / Art / Clothing Family / Social Structure / Leadership Tribal Relations / War
Back to the top
Back to Canada's First Peoples Menu

c Goldi Productions Ltd. 2007